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Why Poetry?

 

A micro-series on when and why we write poetry instead of fiction or memoir, how poetry does what it does, and how we can dig in and use those tools.  Attend one or all free six-week classes offered by Washington Park and Mount Pleasant Libraries.

 

Meet Your Instructor: Rosalynde Vas Dias’ poetry has appeared in Crazyhorse, The Cincinnati Review, West Branch, The Pinch, Laurel Review, The Collagist, The Four Way Review, and elsewhere. Her first book, Only Blue Body, won the Robert Dana Award offered by Anhinga Press. She lives in Providence.


 

Washington Park Library

Thursdays, March 3rd through April 7th, 6pm-8pm

In this six week class we’ll look at the two main ways poets deliver information—the narrative and the lyrical and practice managing strong emotions like grief, anxiety, existential dread or anger using both narrative and lyric delivery.  We’ll write together using exercises based on our in-class reading and designed to be low pressure and make our pens move.  Come ready to read (a little), chat, and write (bring a notebook and pen)! 

Registration Recommended. Contact Amy Rosa 401-781-3136 or email arosa@provcomlib.org.


 

Mount Pleasant Library

Tuesdays, April 5th through May 10th, 6pm-7:30pm

The old writing adage is show don’t tell, but how and when might we show and how and when might we tell? In this six week class, we’ll look at image and tone in poetry and how we balance these (or don’t) with the “talky” bits. We’ll write together using exercises based on our in-class reading and is designed to be low pressure and make our pens move. Come ready to read (a little), chat, and write (bring a notebook and pen)!

Register through Eventbrite. Questions? Contact Lee Smith 401-272-0106 x4203 or email .


 

Washington Park Library

Thursdays, May 19th through June 23rd, 6:30pm-8pm

In this third segment of the Why Poetry? series, we'll look at those poems that throw us off-kilter, intrigue, and spook us.  We’ll dip into the surreal with poems that throw our sense of scale out of whack, contain a visitation or encounter, and otherwise spark the imagination.  Writers DO NOT have to write in a weird way for this class to be helpful.  We'll talk about grounding all your work so the reader feels firmly entrenched in the poem even if they are experiencing something de-stabilizing.  We may cover the ways in which "autobiographical" work is more flexible in the field of poetry and how the magical/mythical can be useful to freeing our poetry from the bounds of the strictly factual.

Registration Recommended. Contact Amy Rosa 401-781-3136 or email arosa@provcomlib.org.


 

Sponsored by:

This program is supported by funds from the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health